Sunday, March 30, 2008

Wild Yellow Violets


It is interesting to note that many of the first wildflowers to appear in Spring are Yellow....such as the Buttercups and Dog Tooth Violets mentioned in earlier posts, and the currently blooming wild yellow Violets. I think God knew how much we would need that warm, sunny color this time of year, to cheer our winter weary souls!



The wild Yellow Violet is a favorite of mine. It is small in size, but not not lacking in charm... possessing a sweet, subtle fragrance.




I researched to find a botanical name for our variety of yellow violets. The leaves are quite different than most of the images I found, until I came across a source on Idaho Wildflowers which identifies it as Viola vallicola, the Valley Violet. It apparently has been reclassified, formally being called Nuttal's violet. It is distinguished by it's large lanceolate leaves, as opposed to the rounder leaves of other types. I am quite happy for it's new name, as Valley Violet is ever so much nicer sounding....and seems fitting for us, living here in our river valley.


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The Violet

Down in a green and shady bed,
A modest violet grew;
Its stalk was bent, it hung its head
As if to hide from view.
And yet it was a lovely flower,
Its color bright and fair;
It might have graced a rosy bower,
Instead of hiding there.

Yet thus it was content to bloom,

Its modest tints arrayed;
And there diffused a sweet perfume,
Within the silent shade.

Then let me to the valley go

This pretty flower to see;
That I may also learn to grow
In sweet humility.

Jane Taylor


22 comments:

Randy and Jamie said...

How wonderful! I've only ever seen the purple and the white ones.

jodi said...

We lived in Ontario for 18 months when I was a teenager, and I loved seeing all the wild yellow violets in the woods near our place. Here we have primarily purple and white wild species, at least in my part of Nova Scotia. So it was nice to take a trip down memory lane with these happy little faces.

Jane Marie said...

I love violets of all kinds. I once had a little kitty I named Violet. She was as sweet and precious as the flower.
Your yellow violet is new to me. I enjoyed viewing it.

Leslie said...

How sweet! And it's true...yellow is such a joyful spring color!

Cat said...

Those are sure inviting to look at, but can I do that in person on the 8th with Hildi? You don't answer your email!

Owin & Irena said...

that is a lovely flower...and i love the poem...good advice for life.
cheers
irena

Connie said...

Cat - You've got mail!

Kim and Victoria said...

Very nice. Love the poem.

kris said...

Now I really want spring to come to Minnesota. I have yellow violets that have naturalized in one of my gardens - they are so precious. Thanks for an early peek! What a sweet little gift your posies were - lucky you to have such a special friend.

Yolanda Elizabet said...

How lovely, wish I could see lots and lots of wild violets in the woods or in a valley. Lovely pics of a very pretty flower!

Catherine said...

They are very pretty, don't usually see too many all yellow ones! And you are right, alot of the first flowers, & blooms are yellow, daffodils, & forsithyia's,&
let's not forget dandelions! :)
Very nice post!
Enjoy the weekend!
Cat

Leslie said...

Connie...there is an award for you over at Growing a Garden in Davis...

Cheryl said...

What a bright and sunny flower. I love the poetry to. Will be back to visit again. Our wild violets in flower at the moment are lilac. No yellows in this part of the world.

Meems said...

Connie: I think you are exactly right about God and springtime flowers cheery your soul. Wild Violets would be lovely to come across as the winter turns back and the north transforms to warmer days.

There's an award waiting for you at Hoe & Shovel. I see Leslie beat me to the punch. It just shows you are doubly deserving!
Meems @Hoe&Shovel

gardenpath said...

That is a pretty one. My New England Audubon field guide says we have a yellow one here, but I haven't seen one.

Iowa Gardening Woman said...

I used to see yellow violets in the woods by our house but I haven't seen any in several years. Lovely photos.

Kylee said...

Oh Connie, these are so pretty! I've never run across yellow ones here.

Louisiana Belle said...

Beautiful photos. I've never seen wild yellow violets. We have bluebonnets here in Texas and they only last a short time.

Sven said...

Good Job! :)

Carolyn said...

Thank you so much for this info--I remember the day we were up Green Canyon, outside of McCammon, ID, and found yellow violets growing in a glad--how nice to know they are now known as Idaho Violets.

Arafea said...

William Cullen Bryant also wrote a poem about the Yellow Violet entitled: "The Yellow Violet." It is a sweet little poem, and the reason I stumbled upon your blog. I recommend you look it up; I'm sure you would enjoy it!

God Bless!

connie said...

HI CONNIE, NOT MANY PEOPLE KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT WHEN I MENTION THE DOG TOOTH VIOLET!!! SO HAPPY TO SEE YOUR COMMENTS. WHEN I MOVED FROM WESTERN MASS TO CAPE COD, I COULD NOT BEAR TO LEAVE ALL THESE VILETS HOME, THEY WERE GROWING NEXT TO A STREAM AND SO BEAUTIFUL. I CAREFULLY TRANSPLANTED QUITE A PATCH OF THEM HERE IN THE WOODS AND THEY HAVE MULTIPLIED LIKE CRAZY. BUT... I HAVE NOT BEEN ABLE TO HAVE THEM BLOSSOM AND THEY HAVE BEEN HERE ABOUT 15 YEARS NOW. THE PATCH IS SOOO HEALTHY LOOKING BUT NOT ONE BLOSSOM . HAVE YOU ANY IDEAS ON WHAT I NEED TO DO TO GET THEN TO BLOSSOM, I LOVE THE YELLOW FLOWERS AND HAVE HAD THEM SINCE I WAS VERY YOUNG, I AM NOW 80 AND WOULD LOVE TO SEE THEM BOSSOM, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR TIME, YOUR PICTURES ARE WONDERFUL!! CONNIE SIMPSON